Raising Awareness about Girls Education on International Day of the Girl

During the assembly, I presented on girls education in India. (Photo credit: Kate Peck)

The International Day of the Girl assembly at my school was a great success! It was a great way to inform my friends, classmates, and teachers about a day dedicated to girls. During the assembly, we informed the school about the different forms of oppression girls around the world experience.

We also talked about intersectionality. Intersectionality is an important term for feminism because issues of race, class, and gender are all connected to feminism. Without intersectionality, the feminist movement would not be as successful because every voice must count. As Black feminist Audre Lorde states, “Within the lesbian community, I am Black, and within the Black community, I am a lesbian.”

The feminism class also mentioned our connection with the Shri Shikshayatan School in Kolkata, India. This is an all-girls school and they are very dedicated to educating girls. On October 11, 2012, which is the International Day of the Girl, the Shri Shikshayatan School canceled all classes to have workshops and assemblies teaching the students all they need to know about educating girls.

10X10 is a non-profit organization that focuses on trying to raise awareness about gloral girls education by creating a documentary about the issue. 10×10 focuses on girls who live in countries like Cambodia, Haiti, India, Peru, Sierra Leone, and more.

My role in this assembly was to introduce to the audience the importance of education for girls by reading off the Shri Shikshayatan School’s presentation about how they celebrated the International Day of the Girl. There are three major issues for girls in India. The three issues include infanticide, trafficking, and education.

I covered girls education in India by saying that not enough girls receive the education that they are required to have. The reason for this is because some girls are forced to abandon their education and forced to marry at a young age or to work in the house or by selling products in local street markets. As stated from the Shri Shikshayatan’s visual presentation, when girls marry at a young age, it “restricts them to household work only.”

This leaves education out of the question for girls who are forced into these unfair circumstances. I felt that this information was very important to share with the audience because it shows that education is highly important in order to prevent the girl from being oppressed as they are in India. Education is the key to escape from poverty and a road to a healthier life.

As stated in the 10×10 website, the longer girls stay in school, the greater their job and career opportunities are, the more money they earn, they healthier they stay, and so much more. Education encourages girls to stand up and “speak up” for themselves. The more girls with education, the more girls will speak up and make a change. With education, poverty among girls will decrease; they will form their own businesses and pass their knowledge on, which further educates the next generation. This is why the students of the Shri Shikshayatan School value education for girls so much and think that it’s a major problem that not all girls in India receive the same education as they do.

I’ve got to say that I’m really proud of my peers who also participated in the assembly. They all had very important parts and they all did a great job in presenting them. The reason I feel so proud not only for myself, but for the rest of my classmates is because I felt like we were a really unified team who didn’t present the assembly to the school because we were required to, but because we wanted to ourselves present it.

A lot of my classmates on stage seemed really enthusiastic about presenting because they really wanted the audience to listen to what they each had to say. They wanted the audience to be intrigued and to be just as committed to this change as we were. It was great that some students got to read off their intersectionality pieces so that the audience was able to understand in more depth what intersectionality was and its connection to feminism.

I really have to applaud those readers who were willing to share with us their personal stories and to simply say to them thank you. I felt that we really made an impact in people’s views about girls all over the world because many of the people in the audience were unaware of issues like the ones discussed in the assembly. Many other schools did the same thing we did by informing their community about these important issues. When a lot schools do this, the more people we will inform and the more people will get involved to solve these issues.

In a sense, my classmates and I have given valuable knowledge to many as well as other students have from other schools. We were in a sense part of a big movement happening all over the nation and the world.

I hope that my classmates and I have really taught the audience something about girls around the world. With more people interested in making changes for girls around the world, the bigger impact we will make and the more girls we will be able to help. When you educate girls, you can change the world.

13 thoughts on “Raising Awareness about Girls Education on International Day of the Girl

  1. I completely agree with your take on girls education. For the future, in what ways can you take a more hands-on approach to spreading awareness about girls education in New York City?

  2. Nathaniel poses an interesting question. Though I did appreciate how passionately you talked about spreading the word about why it’s not right that some girls cannot receive an education for various reasons

  3. I like the way you tied together all the issues we covered in the assembly in a reflective light. It gave a new depth to my opinions of the assembly.
    Nathaniel’s question is a hard one to answer and it’s hard to know how to get people to listen but more assemblies like this one will definitely make the world turn its head.

  4. Great job painting the picture of our International Day of the Girl assembly. I can see that you genuinely enjoyed in participating in the assembly as well as watching the rest of classmates share their pieces in relation to International Day of the Girl.

  5. I love the passion instilled in your blog post for spreading the knowledge of girls issues globally and the willingness to reform women’s rights all over the world as a whole. Going off of what Nathaniel has said, how exactly would you be proactive in spreading the facts and views about girls’ education in our community? Your enthusiasm is quite contagious, you did a wonderful job. Keep on!

  6. You managed to capture exactly what we were trying to get across during the assembly. “I felt that this information was very important to share with the audience because it shows that education is highly important in order to prevent girls from being oppressed as they are in India. Education is the key to escape from poverty and a road to a healthier life.” You stated it perfectly, and I hope that this is the message that everyone during the assembly, and everyone who reads this will receive as well. Great job!

  7. I appreciated that your piece was maybe a little more informal then others, I think it makes it easy for the reader to connect to you and what you are saying, also your style of writing is very clear, somehow you I found it to be very visible that it was written by you. Also I valued the fact that you ended your piece stating your feelings after the assembly, “I hope that my classmates and I have really taught the audience something about girls around the world. With more people interested in making changes for girls around the world, the bigger impact we will make and the more girls we will be able to help. When you educate girls, you can change the world.” I thought this was touching because showed the reader how much you care about the topic and your wish that not only what we said came across but that it changed something in our peers’ point of view and feminism and girls rights.

  8. You did a great job explaining the issues with education in India that we have been studying in class. This blogpost also flows really nicely, first with the introduction of the term “intersecitonality” and incorporating a quotation from Audre Lorde, and then going into detail about IDG and our assembly. I think you really emphasized the importance of education and how it will lead to brighter futures for girls.

  9. Your blog post seems very passionate, specifically regarding education of girls in India and all over the world. After reading your paragraph about 10×10, I am curious about the perspectives of the girls at the Shri Shikshayatan school. I wonder if any of them have friends who don’t have the chance to go to school or if the girls’ parents were able to attend school.

  10. I thought that you did a great job in summing up the assembly. I also hope that we educated our fellow peers and teachers about the importance of getting involved and thriving from it. I also appreciated the dedication and passion that shined through your words. You allowed readers to feel the level of excitement that you seem to have for the tragedies going around us. I felt like i could really see the way that you grew from the beginning of our class to now, learning and stating that “With more people interested in making changes for girls around the world, the bigger impact we will make and the more girls we will be able to help. When you educate girls, you can change the world.” I am excited to see where this will take you!

  11. I liked the way that you said “education is the key to escape from poverty and a road to a healthier life”. You make it clear that in order to change the lives of girls and to eventually change the world, girls need to have access to education. I also liked the evidence that you used to support this, saying that “the more girls with education, the more girls will speak up and make a change”. You also talk about how education is the key to decreasing poverty among girls, because it will allow them to “form their own businesses and pass their knowledge on”. Before learning about feminism and women’s rights around the world, I never thought about how lucky I am to have been born in a country where I have full access to education. I find this aspect of your post to be so vital because you highlight just some of the many opportunities and skills that an education could provide.

  12. I love the way you opened up your piece. I could feel your excitement when you wrote: “The International Day of the Girl assembly at my school was a great success!”
    I know it probably wasn’t your main goal in writing this piece, but right away I found myself smiling and I got a sense of pride, with the satisfaction that our assembly was a success!
    It’s reading on that I realise why it was such a success, it was because we were all so well informed of what this day represents and why it’s needed. When you wrote: “The reason I feel so proud not only for myself, but for the rest of my classmates is because I felt like we were a really unified team who didn’t present the assembly to the school because we were required to, but because we wanted to ourselves present it.” I couldn’t agree more! Sure, it was a part of our class to do the assembly, but we didn’t feel like it was work.
    It’s only work if we didn’t want to do, but we all did. We all were passionate about sharing our knowledge with the rest of the school and to spread the important message that IDG represents.

    Your piece really brought to light the depth and different ways in which we presented the assembly.
    Your piece is incredibly informing and is a pleasure to read.
    “I hope that my classmates and I have really taught the audience something about girls around the world” I can assure you that we have!

    And your last line, helped to deliver your whole piece with one last final “punch” : “When you educate girls, you can change the world.”

  13. I’m so glad that you enjoyed delivering the IDG assembly to the school; you clearly were very excited to be a part of sharing what the Shri Shikshayatan School had sent to us about girls’ issues in India. You did a great job during the assembly! I would’ve liked to have seen a bit more probing of the issues in this post, especially on intersectionality; be sure to push further your analysis in upcoming posts. I’m looking forward to reading more of your work!

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